Too be honest…The Vorbing by Stewart Stafford is a Must Read!

  

To be honest…I loved this book!  The Vorbing is a must read for all. Mr. Stafford (who is in my opinion a brilliant writer) takes the Vampire myth and turns it on it’s end by keeping to the original myths and dare I say history. In this fantastic novel vampires are neither gorgeous nor sparkling like most most fantasy novels or tv shows on the CW (The Vampire Diaries and the Originals). The novel keeps to traditional Celtic lore and as the series names, is the Vampire Creation Myth. The characters keep you reading and the vampires keep you invested in this new haunting series. Grab your copy today on Amazon HERE and enjoy being spooked!

You can also sign up on his blog for email updates about the series at StewartStaffordBlog.wordpress.com

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Beer-Candied Bacon (YUM)

Here’s an interesting yet incredibly yummy recipe! Enjoy! 🙂

Beer-Candied Bacon
1 lb thick-cut, high quality bacon
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup + 2 tbsp beer (I used Dogfish Head’s Chicory Stout)
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Combine brown sugar and beer in a small bowl, whisking well to form a thin syrup. Set aside.
Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil. Place a wire cooling rack on top. Place the pieces of bacon on top of the rack, overlapping if necessary. Place in oven and cook for 10 minutes.
Remove from oven and brush one side of the bacon with the beer syrup. Flip, and coat the other side with the syrup as well. Return to oven and cook for 10 minutes. Remove from oven, and repeat process another time or two more, until bacon is crispy and browned, and you’ve used all the glaze.
Cool on wire rack for at least 1 hour before serving.
Source: adapted from Oskar Blues Brewery
I made this beer-candied bacon to go in conjunction with a Bacon Stout Chocolate Cheesecake. If you’re into the idea of beer and bacon, make sure to check it out here!
URL to article: http://tideandthyme.com/beer-candied-bacon/

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Quote of the day!

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You don’t write about the horrors of war. No. You write about a kid’s burnt socks lying in the road.

Richard Price

October 12, 1949: Happy 64th birthday, Richard Price! The author of Clockers and Lush Life has also written for the acclaimed television series The Wire.

Too be honest… I didn’t think this feature was foolproof

The iPhone’s Fingerprint Sensor Has Already Been Hacked

A quick answer to the biggest question about TouchID.
By John Herrman
BuzzFeed Staff

A European hacker group has announced a simple, replicable method for spoofing Apple’s TouchID fingerprint authentication system. “A fingerprint of the phone user, photographed from a glass surface, was enough to create a fake finger that could unlock an iPhone 5s secured with TouchID,” claims the Chaos Computer Club, which demonstrated the hack in a video.
The technique is based on previous methods for spoofing fingerprint authentication systems, and needed only minor adaptation to be applied to the iPhone’s unusually high-resolution scanner. According to the CCC:
First, the fingerprint of the enrolled user is photographed with 2400 dpi resolution. The resulting image is then cleaned up, inverted and laser printed with 1200 dpi onto transparent sheet with a thick toner setting. Finally, pink latex milk or white woodglue is smeared into the pattern created by the toner onto the transparent sheet. After it cures, the thin latex sheet is lifted from the sheet, breathed on to make it a tiny bit moist and then placed onto the sensor to unlock the phone.
Apple has marketed TouchID both as a convenience and as a security feature. “Your fingerprint is one of the best passwords in the world,” says an Apple promotional video. “The technology within TouchID is some of the most advanced hardware or software we’ve put in any device.”
This method, while objectively fairly simple, will not be a practical threat for most users; it’s hard to imagine a situation in which photographing someone’s fingerprint in high resolution is easier than finding out their four-digit PIN.
But it’s still a clear way to gain unauthorized access to a device the user assumes is secure — and this is just the first successful method. The iPhone has fingerprint spoofing into a bigger target than ever; it’s reasonable to assume that more people will be able to hit it.
Whether or not this can be fixed with a software update is unclear. 

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